While the global cannabis community awaits October 17th, the day cannabis becomes fully legal in Canada, some are understandably worried about how legalization will impact people at the Canada-U.S. border. While it is unfortunate that some Canadians may be prevented from entering the United States and some American citizens will, unfortunately, face criminal punishment after forgetting about some Canadian cannabis they left in the car, it is widely believed that legalization in Canada will help spur legalization efforts in the U.S. and around the world.

Somewhat flying under the radar has been the fact that Mexico’s new president campaigned on reforming the Drug War and America’s southern neighbor could end prohibition in the near future. How will the Trump administration react if American citizens are traveling to Mexico to purchase free cannabis? We are likely to get firmer answers if Mexico starts progressing towards ending prohibition, but we got a preview of the Trump administration’s stance on Mexico ending the Drug War at a White House press briefing today.

Marijuana Moment’s Tom Angell provides some background and notes Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders’ response to being asked :

Mexico voted to elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador as the country’s next president earlier this month and, while he hasn’t personally taken a clear position on ending marijuana prohibition, he has expressed open-mindedness to broad drug policy reform efforts and is expected to appoint a legalization supporter to a key cabinet post.

For example, López Obrador has floated the idea of granting amnesty to low-level drug offenders such as farmers who grow opium poppy or marijuana.

And on Wednesday, it was also reported that the president-elect told his nominee to lead the interior ministry that she could explore the possibility of legalizing all drugs in order to reduce drug-related violence in Mexico, giving her “carte blanche” on the issue.

The Washington Examiner initially covered Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders reaction when asked about the possibility of Mexico legalizing all drugs:

“Certainly we’re going to continue engaging with our Mexican partners,” Sanders said. “I don’t have a specific policy announcement on that front. However, I can say that we would not support the legalization of all drugs anywhere and certainly wouldn’t want to do anything that would allow more drugs to come into this country.”

Donald Trump has staked out a states’ rights position on cannabis, both on the campaign trail and as president, and he reportedly expressed support for legalizing all drugs in the early 1990s, so it will be interesting to see how his administration reacts if both of our border nations end cannabis prohibition. Hopefully, the United States will see the jobs and revenue created and act quickly to embrace legalization and we don’t get bogged down by an antiquated Reefer Madness mindset or an unfortunate trade or Twitter war. Mexico has suffered enough from a failed and harmful Drug War, the nation needs a new approach, starting with ending cannabis prohibition.

Learn the latest about cannabis legalization around the world at the upcoming International Cannabis Business Conference in Portland, Oregon, this September 27th-28th. Secure your tickets by September 12th to save $200!